Computing

Our approach to the Computing curriculum

The curriculum will be broad, balanced and integrated with the breadth and depth that will support students whichever pathway they choose at Key Stage 4 and beyond. We will provide students with an understanding of the foundations of computing, to help them better apply information technology and better understand the implications of the technologies they use.

Wherever possible we will teach computing without computers, but will use information technology to evidence and enhance learning. We will use computational thinking to develop confident, creative and resilient problem solvers. Teaching and learning will focus on solving (scalable) real-life problems, and we will ensure strong links to other curriculum subjects. We will use programming tools to bridge the gap between models (good computational thinking) and computers, selecting the appropriate programming language for the challenge and enabling us to teach key programming concepts rather than teaching programming languages for the sake of it.

 

Our approach to lessons

The primary goal of the Computing Department is to promote Computer Science (and computing in general) to young people as an interesting, engaging, and intellectually stimulating discipline. We want to capture the boy’s imagination and address common misconceptions about what it means to be a computer scientist.

The lesson approaches often tend to be kinaesthetic, focusing on the Enterprise skills of the school, involving teamwork, problem solving and so on. The activities allow students to discover answers for themselves and help them to realize that they are capable of finding solutions to problems on their own, rather than being given the solution to apply to the problem. For example, students don’t really need to be able to convert numbers to binary, but it is valuable for them to discover the patterns such as the doubling value of bits, patterns when you count in binary, and how the range increases exponentially as you add bits.

Department Staff

  • Jordan Angol - Head of Computer Science and Business Studies: j.angol@fulhamboysschool.org.uk
  • Karima Sahel - Computing and Business Studies Teacher

Curriculum

Year 7 curriculum 

E-Safety, Using computers (Google Drive etc) and the Internet

  • School Systems
  • E-Safety
  • G-Suite

Inputs/Outputs and Memory

  • Types of Computer
  • Input/Processes/Output
  • Hardware
  • Memory & Storage

Excel Spreadsheet Modelling

  • Summarise Data
  • Databases
  • Functions & Formulas

Graphic Design and Copyright

  • Copyright & Magazine Covers
  • Using Fireworks to create a wireframe
  • Using Photoshop to adapt an image

Basic Programming Techniques

  • Computational Thinking
  • Problem Decomposition and Scratch Overview
  • Games Development

How the boys will be assessed in Year 7

The assessment framework has been developed based on a tiered system, with students trying to ‘tick off’ the criteria in each box by the end of Year 9.The units have been designed to allow students to progress across the 3 years. It works based on 6 strands of computing (Computational Thinking, Programming, Data Representation, Computers, Networking and IT), and each strand is covered in one unit of work.
Students will also be assessed using exam papers based on GCSE style questions.

Year 8 curriculum

Turtle Programming and Algorithms

  • Turtle Programming
  • Iteration and Selection
  • Functions
  • Parameters
  • Lists

Networking and the Internet

  • Internet and the World Wide Web
  • Domains & IP
  • Email & VoIP
  • Network Protocols
  • Network Security

How data is represented in computers

  • Binary and Memory
  • Representing Text and Numbers
  • Image Representation
  • Sound Representation

Software and Hardware

  • Role of the Operating System
  • Software
  • Digital Footprint
  • Appropriate software use
  • Data Collection and Analysis

How the boys will be assessed in Year 8

The assessment framework has been developed based on a tiered system, with students trying to ‘tick off’ the criteria in each box by the end of Year 9. The units have been designed to allow students to progress across the 3 years.It works based on 6 strands of computing (Computational Thinking, Programming, Data Representation, Computers, Networking and IT), and each strand is covered in one unit of work.
Students will also be assessed using exam papers based on GCSE style questions.

Year 9 curriculum

Artificial Intelligence

  • History of Artificial Intelligence
  • Artificial InArtificial Intelligence
  • telligence Developments
  • Consequences
  • Artificial Intelligence Ethics

Programming Algorithms & Evaluation

  • The software development cycle
  • Problem decomposition and algorithm design
  • Testing and success criteria
  • Programming techniques
  • Program developing/testing

Further Programming Techniques

  • Effective coding
  • Program development
  • Final testing
  • Evaluation 

Cryptography

  • Encryption
  • Caesar cipher
  • Hashing
  • Decoding ciphers
  • Encryption ethics
  • Public key cryptography

Boolean Logic and Processing

  • Fetch - Decode - Execute
  • History of computers
  • Code translators
  • Boolean logic
  • Logic puzzles

How the boys will be assessed in Year 9
The assessment framework has been developed based on a tiered system, with students trying to ‘tick off’ the criteria in each box by the end of Year 9. The units have been designed to allow students to progress across the 3 years.It works based on 6 strands of computing (Computational Thinking, Programming, Data Representation, Computers, Networking and IT), and each strand is covered in one unit of work. Students will also be assessed using exam papers based on GCSE style questions.

GCSE - Exam board OCR

The GCSE (9–1) in Computer Science is a linear qualification with a 100% terminal rule. There are two externally examined units (01 and 02) weighted at 50% each. Each examined unit consists of an exam paper with a duration of 1 hour 30 minutes. 

Unit 1 will introduce learners to the Central Processing Unit (CPU), computer memory and storage, wired and wireless networks, network topologies, system security and system software. It is expected that learners will become familiar with the impact of Computer Science in a global context through the study of the ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns associated with Computer Science.

Unit 2 incorporates and builds on the knowledge and understanding gained in Component 01, encouraging learners to apply this knowledge and understanding using computational thinking. Learners will be introduced to algorithms and programming, learning about programming techniques, how to produce robust programs, computational logic, translators and facilities of computing languages and data representation. Learners will become familiar with computing related mathematics. 
 

GCSE curriculum

Year 10

Component 01:

  • Systems Architecture
  • Memory
  • Storage
  • Wired and wireless networks
  • Network topologies, protocols and layers
  • System security 
  • System software
  • Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns

Year 11

Component 02:

  • Algorithms
  • Programming techniques
  • Producing robust programs
  • Computational logic 
  • Translators and facilities of languages
  • Data representation

How the boys will be assessed

  • GCSE practice exam papers
  • Final GCSE Assessment

A Level - Exam board OCR

In the A Level in Computer Science, the learners must take three components (01, 02 and 03) to be awarded the OCR A Level.  is a linear qualification with a 100% terminal rule.
There are two externally examined units (01 and 02) weighted at 40% each and a programming project (03) weighted at 20%. Each examined unit consists of an exam paper with a duration of 2 hour 30 minutes. 

Component 01 will introduce learners to the internal workings of the Central Processing Unit (CPU), the exchange of data and will also look at software development, data types and legal and ethical issues. It is expected that learners will draw on this underpinning content when studying computational thinking, developing programming techniques and devising their own programming approach in the Programming project component (03 or 04).

Component 02 will incorporate and build on the knowledge and understanding gained in the Computer systems component (01). In addition, learners should: 

  • understand what is meant by computational thinking 
  • understand the benefits of applying computational thinking to solving a wide variety of problems
  • understand the principles of solving problems by computational methods
  • be able to use algorithms to describe problems
  • be able to analyse a problem by identifying its component parts.

In Component 03 learners will be expected to analyse, design, develop, test, evaluate and document a program written in a suitable programming language. The underlying approach to the project is to apply the principles of computational thinking to a practical coding problem. Learners are expected to apply appropriate principles from an agile development approach to the project development

A Level curriculum

Component 01:

  • The characteristics of contemporary processors, input, output and storage devices
  • Software and software development
  • Exchanging data
  • Data types, data structures and algorithms
  • Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues

Component 02:

  • Elements of computational thinking
  • Problem solving and programming
  • Algorithms to solve problems and standard algorithms

Component 03:

  • Analysis of the problem
  • Design of the solution
  • Developing the solution
  • Evaluation 

How the boys will be assessed

  • A Level practice exam papers
  • Final A Level Assessment
     

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website